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The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) is the independent statutory authority that regulates Victoria's gambling and liquor industries.

Our vision is that Victorians and visitors enjoy safe and responsible gambling and liquor environments.
Gambling
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The VCGLR regulates businesses focusing on the people, premises, products and promotions involved in supplying gambling to ensure the integrity of Victoria's gambling industries and to minimise harm.
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Ministerial directions, guidelines and orders

Other related content
Regulatory Approach

Ministerial directions and guidelines are issued by the relevant Minister in the Government Gazette.

The directions and guidelines set the direction for gambling and liquor licensing in Victoria, and are taken into account by the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (the Commission) in licensing decisions.

For information about gaming directions and guidelines issued by the Commission, please go to the VCGLR directions and guidelines.

Liquor

Cumulative impact decision-making guidelines

The Decision-Making Guidelines for cumulative impact applies to liquor licence applications for new licensed premises and variations to existing licensed premises that were submitted since 4 August 2011.

Cumulative impact refers to the impacts that results from a concentration of licensed premises in a defined area. Evidence suggests that cumulative impact is associated with a range of both positive and negative outcomes that arise from the combination of many factors such as physical and environmental setting, the mix of premises and their operating conditions.

The positive outcomes can include the creation of a local identity or status as an entertainment destination, enhanced vitality of the area, economic benefits, and an increase in consumer choice.

The negative outcomes of cumulative impact can include crime, a loss of amenity, and antisocial behaviours.

Potential cumulative impacts vary between locations and depend on the number and type of licensed premises, and the capacity of the local area to accommodate the concentration.

The Guidelines enable the Commission to assess the contribution of a new licensed premises, or the variation of an existing licensed premises to the cumulative impact of licensed premises in an area.

For more information, download the Decision-Making Guidelines for cumulative impact (PDF 135KB).

Ministerial Order on Advanced RSA training

The Minister has determined that applicants for a new late night (general) licence or late night (on-premises) licence that authorises the supply of liquor after 1am for on-premises consumption must complete the advanced RSA training program. This requirement does not apply in relation to late night (on-premises) licences with restaurant and cafe conditions.

The Minister has also determined that holders of a general licence, on-premises licence, late night (general) licence or late night (on-premises) licence that authorises the supply of liquor after 11pm for on-premises consumption must complete the advanced RSA training program if they receive a demerit point from the VCGLR.

The Ministerial Order on Advanced RSA training (PDF, 312KB) is available to download. More information on advanced RSA training is available for further details.

Packaged liquor licence decision-making guidelines

The Decision-Making Guidelines for packaged liquor (PDF, 132KB) apply to licences seeking to supply packaged liquor, including those that operate outside ordinary trading hours. It considers the grant of licences seeking to supply packaged liquor within the objective of harm minimisation. It states that licences seeking to supply packaged liquor with trading hours that are greater than ordinary trading hours (as defined in section 3 of the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998) should only be granted by the Commission in exceptional circumstances, and that hours should not extend past midnight.

Restrictions on applications for late night licences decision-making guidelines

The Victorian Government has extended the "freeze" or suspension on the granting of new (as well as variation and relocation) licence applications wanting to trade past 1am in the inner city municipalities of Melbourne (including Docklands), Stonnington, Yarra and Port Phillip.

The freeze has been extended until 30 June 2019. During this time, the VCGLR will not grant applications for licences that apply to trade past 1am unless the applicant meets certain conditions. For more information download Decision making guidelines - restrictions on late night licences (PDF, 327KB) or visit the Late night freeze page.

Gambling

Approval of premises as suitable for gaming

Locating gaming machines in a building with permanent residential accommodation is inconsistent with the Gambling Regulation Act 2003 responsible gambling objectives.

When considering application for the approval of premises as suitable for gaming, the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation must have regard to the Victorian Government's policy that any building that includes (or is planned to include) permanent residential accommodation should not be approved as a premises suitable for gaming. 

Applicants should read the decision-making guidelines (PDF, 100KB) for full details. 

Assessment of children's play areas within gaming premises

Venue operators making an application to the VCGLR for approval of premises as suitable for gaming are required to specify in their application how the proposal will provide a responsible gambling environment, including outlining the location and appropriateness of a children's play area.

The guidelines set out the matters that the VCGLR will have regard to when assessing the suitability of premises for gaming that contain a children's play area.

From 16 October 2013, the guidelines will apply to a determination of:

  • an application for approval of premises for gaming
  • application for modification of a gaming machine area
  • amendment to venue operator licence - vary gaming machines (Note: This applies to assessment of Attachment A - application for modification of a gaming machine area).

In determining these applications, the VCGLR will have regard to the objectives of ensuring, as far as practicable, that a children's play area in a gaming venue is designed such that it:

  • is located as far away as practicable from the gaming machine area
  • does not have a line of sight from the play area into the gaming machine area or from the gaming machine area into the play area
  • does not permit sounds from gaming machines to be heard in the children's play area
  • is not directly accessible from the gaming machine area
  • is conducive to being monitored by venue staff to help ensure that minors are not left unattended.

Applicants should read the Decision-making guidelines - assessment of childrens play areas (PDF, 440KB) for full details.

Automatic teller machines in a gaming venue

There are certain matters that need to be taken into account by the the Commission in determining whether to grant an approval for automatic teller machines in a gaming venues. Download the Ministerial direction for automatic teller machine in a gaming venue (PDF, 408KB) for more information.

Ban of moneyless gaming machines

It is an offence for a person while the ban is in force, to offer or provide 'moneyless gaming machines' or to adopt a gambling practice in connection with these 'moneyless gaming machines'.

A 'moneyless gaming machine':

  • was originally manufactured for use as a gaming machine as defined in the Gambling Regulation Act 2003
  • has been modified so that it cannot accept money or pay out money
  • retains other features of a gaming machine that enable it to be otherwise played as a gaming machine
  • is not a lucky envelope vending machine as defined under section 8.1.2 of the Gambling Regulation Act
  • the possession of which is not authorised under section 3.2.2 or 3.5.1 of the Gambling Regulation Act.

The then Minister for Gaming has made a fixed term order banning moneyless gaming machines for a period of ten years from 14 March 2012. The Ministerial direction - ban of moneyless gaming machines (PDF, 580 KB) is available for download.

Ban of the use of earphones and other listening devices on gaming machines

The then Minister for Gaming has made a fixed term order banning the use of earphones, earpieces, headphones, headsets, or any other device, on a gaming machine that converts signals from a gaming machine to audible sound that is delivered to the ear of a person playing a gaming machine and is not designed or intended primarily to assist a hearing impaired person.

The fixed term order is for a period of ten years from 3 December 2012.

The Ministerial direction - Ban of earphones & listening devices in gaming areas (PDF, 575 KB) is available for download.

Community benefit statement

The ministerial direction defines the activities that constitute community purposes and can be claimed in a community benefit statement. Download the Ministerial Direction - Community benefit statement(PDF, 654KB) for further information.

Gaming machine entitlement allocation and transfer rules

Entitlements may be transferred from one venue operator to another (or may be allocated by the State) through a transfer scheme. For more information, download the Ministerial Determination - Gaming machine entitlement allocation and transfer rules (PDF, 377KB).

Maximum number of gaming machine entitlements

The Minister has set the maximum number of gaming machine entitlements under which gaming may be conducted to be 27,372, see Ministerial Order - number of gaming machine entitlements (PDF, 390KB).

Player Information Standards

The Player Information Standards contain printed materials that are part of a range of initiatives to promote responsible gambling in Victoria. The YourPlay scheme is a government initiative that can assist players to make informed decisions about their gambling and it will be available on all gaming machines state-wide from 1 December 2015.

The Gambling Regulations 2015 enable the Minister to make standards setting out the information and the required form of printed player information materials that are required to be displayed in venues.

The VCGLR is responsible for ensuring industry compliance with this requirement. For more information visit the gaming signage page.

Requirements for gaming machines

The following ministerial directions relate to requirements for gaming machines in Victoria. Click on the individual direction for more information. 

Responsible Gambling Code of Conduct

It is compulsory for certain organisations that hold gambling industry participants to have a code of conduct to ensure they comply with regulations and to promote harm minimisation caused by problem gambling. Download the Ministerial Direction for Responsible Gambling Code of Conduct (PDF, 36KB) for more information.

Self exclusion program

A self exclusion program is a service offered by the gaming industry to those people who wish to exclude themselves from gaming areas in clubs and hotels in Victoria. As stated in the Gambling Regulation Act 2003 it is compulsory for gaming venue operators to have a self exclusion program. Download the Ministerial Direction for self exclusion program (PDF, 41KB) for more information.

Trade promotion lottery maximum entry cost increased

The Minister has determined that the maximum amount of prescribed costs associated with entering trade promotion lotteries will be increased from $0.70 to $1 effective from Tuesday 9 February 2016.

For more information, download the Ministerial Direction - trade promotion lottery max entry cost (PDF, 258 KB).

YourPlay / Pre-Commitment requirements

From 1 December 2015, there are new arrangements for the regulation of the Victorian gaming industry to reflect the commencement of the state-wide pre-commitment scheme. The new arrangements reflect that the only limit setting system allowed in relation to electronic gaming machines in the casino and approved venues from 1 December 2015 will be the pre-commitment system.

See Ministerial Direction - Pre-commitment (PDF, 2.5MB).

Page last modified 
18 October 2017