CLOSE
Refine your search options
I want to
The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) is the independent statutory authority that regulates Victoria's gambling and liquor industries.

Our vision is that Victorians and visitors enjoy safe and responsible gambling and liquor environments.
Gambling
Gambling
The VCGLR regulates businesses focusing on the people, premises, products and promotions involved in supplying gambling to ensure the integrity of Victoria's gambling industries and to minimise harm.
Every situation is unique.
What best describes your situation in the Victorian gambling industry?
  • Gaming venue operator
  • Gaming industry employee
  • Wagering and sports betting
  • Bookmaker (and employee)
  • Lotteries
  • Bingo
  • Keno
  • Raffle
  • Casino
  • Community and charitable gaming
  • Manufacturer, supplier or tester
  • Monitoring service
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence, permit or registration
  • Understand your gaming licence
  • Manage my gaming licence
  • Education and training
  • Public holiday trading
  • Licensee resources
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your licence
  • Manage my licence
  • Education and training
  • Licensee resources
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your permit
  • Manage my licence
  • Bookmaker employee application
  • Licensee resources
  • Back
  • Trade promotion lotteries
  • Public lotteries
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your permit
  • Manage my licence
  • Licensee resources
  • Back
  • About Keno
  • Understand your permit
  • Licensee resources
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence or permit
  • Understand your permit
  • Manage my licence
  • Licensee resources
  • Back
  • Understand your permit
  • Licensee resources
  • Back
  • Apply for a new permit
  • Understand your permit
  • Manage my permit
  • Licensee resources
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your permit
  • Manage my licence
  • Licensee resources
Liquor
Liquor
The VCGLR regulates businesses focusing on the people, premises, products and promotions involved in supplying liquor to ensure the integrity of Victoria's liquor industries and to minimise harm.
Every situation is unique.
What best describes your situation in the Victorian liquor industry?
  • Restaurant / Cafe
  • Bar / Night club
  • Live music venue
  • Temporary or major event
  • Bottleshop
  • Sexually explicit entertainment venue
  • Liquor Accord Member
  • Liquor Wholesaler
  • Sporting and community club
  • Pub
  • BYO
  • Winery, Brewery or Distillery
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your liquor licence
  • Manage my licence
  • Education and training
  • Public holiday trading
  • Licensee resources
  • Forums and accords
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your liquor licence
  • Manage my licence
  • Education and training
  • Public holiday trading
  • Licensee resources
  • Forums and accords
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your liquor licence
  • Manage my licence
  • Education and training
  • Public holiday trading
  • Licensee resources
  • Forums and accords
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your liquor licence
  • Manage my licence
  • Education and training
  • Public holiday trading
  • Licensee resources
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your liquor licence
  • Manage my licence
  • Education and training
  • Public holiday trading
  • Licensee resources
  • Forums and accords
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your liquor licence
  • Manage my licence
  • Education and training
  • Public holiday trading
  • Licensee resources
  • Forums and accords
  • Back
  • Understand your liquor licence
  • Manage my licence
  • Forums and accords
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your liquor licence
  • Manage my licence
  • Licensee resources
  • Forums and accords
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your liquor licence
  • Manage my licence
  • Education and training
  • Public holiday trading
  • Licensee resources
  • Forums and accords
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your liquor licence
  • Manage my licence
  • Education and training
  • Public holiday trading
  • Licensee resources
  • Forums and accords
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your liquor licence
  • Manage my licence
  • Public holiday trading
  • Forums and accords
  • Back
  • Apply for a new licence
  • Understand your liquor licence
  • Manage my licence
  • Education and training
  • Public holiday trading
  • Licensee resources
Help
How can we help?
Refine your search options
 

Media

We are an independent statutory authority that regulates Victoria’s gambling and liquor industries to ensure their integrity and to minimise harm. Our vision is that Victorians and visitors enjoy safe and responsible gambling and liquor environments.

We are one of several regulators working in a system of oversight of the gambling and liquor industries and we work collaboratively with a wide range of state and federal government regulators and law enforcement agencies.

To understand more about what we do, see:

Who we are, what we do 

2018-19 Annual Report  (PDF, 2.38 MB)

 

Contact the VCGLR media team

All media enquiries should be made via the Strategic Communications team. We operate during business hours and we aim to respond to you as quickly as possible:

 

Restrictions on information we can release 

We are open and transparent with the information we share or responses we provide to the media, consistent with the principles of open access to government information contained in the Freedom of Information Act 1982. Due to legislative restrictions and procedural fairness, there is some information we cannot provide and some matters we cannot comment on. These include:

  • active applications being processed by the VCGLR
  • matters currently under internal review or appeal with the VCGLR
  • whether individuals or entities are the subject of any investigation by the VCGLR
  • personal information held by the VCGLR which may only be disclosed according to the information privacy principles in the Privacy and Data Protection Act 2014.

In addition, the Gambling Regulation Act 2003 contains a strict confidentiality regime (see sections 10.1.29 – 10.1.34) that restricts us from disclosing information, with respect to the affairs of any person, that is acquired by the VCGLR in the performance of its functions under a gaming Act or gaming regulations (protected information). If the information requested is protected information, the VCGLR cannot disclose it unless disclosure is permitted under section 10.1.32.

 

Media releases

Below are our media releases for 2019. For media releases published prior to 2019 please contact our media team on the above contact details.

 

Wangaratta liquor forum resumes

 15 November 2019

(Quotes attributable to Veronica Goluza, Manager Education, VCGLR)

Wangaratta’s local liquor forum is being reactivated.

Supported by the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR), liquor forums provide an opportunity for licensees, council and Police to collaborate on local issues. Forums not only help improve the operations of licensed premises, they foster the promotion of best practices when it comes to the responsible service, sale and consumption of alcohol.

Penny Hargrave from Rural City of Wangaratta, said, “The purpose of the forum is to bring together local liquor licensees to address relevant issues and to provide a collaborative and committed approach that will be beneficial to both licensed premises and the community.

“The forum will look at ways businesses can contribute to the safety of patrons, staff, local community and visitors by promoting the responsible service, sale and consumption of alcohol and ensuring good behaviour in and around licensed premises.

“As we draw closer to the festive season these will be important topics to discuss. We will be able to learn from each other and to look at ‘best practice’ in this area,” said Penny.   

The VCGLR’s Education team will be in attendance for the first meeting on 18 November.

VCGLR ‘s Manager for Education, Veronica Goluza said “We aim to improve voluntary compliance by educating the gambling and liquor industry.”

“Liquor forums are a great way for local matters to be addressed and to ensure local licensees are aware of their legal responsibilities, available resources, and the latest industry news.

“Attending forums like the one in Wangaratta also enables us to learn about the challenges that licensees and other stakeholder face in their local community when it comes to gambling and liquor.”

VCGLR’s education team will also be conducting their ‘Street Talk’ program while in the area to help licensees and their staff keep up to date with gambling and liquor laws.

There are more than 170 liquor licences across the Wangaratta region. This includes businesses such as restaurants and cafes through to late-night pubs and sporting clubs.

If you are a local licensee and would like to get involved or for more information, go to www.vcglr.vic.gov.au/find-my-local-liquor-forum

Background information

There are more than 85 liquor forums across Victoria, 65 of which are currently active and hold regular meetings.

By working together, licensees maximise opportunities to attract patrons and minimise potential incidents.

Benefits include:

  • Keep up-to-date with changes to liquor and gambling laws
  • Contribute and make a difference in your local community
  • Get to know your local police, council and VCGLR representatives
  • Enhance your business and make your venue welcoming and safe for everyone
  • Network with colleagues and stakeholders.

The VCGLR provides support and guidance to forums by publicising meeting dates and local forum contacts, and through a monthly forum bulletin with legislative updates, industry news and reminders.

In 2018-19 four forums sought assistance from the VCGLR to be reactivated and VCGLR staff attended 90 forum events – 42 in metropolitan Melbourne and 48 in regional Victoria. 

Forums may be formalised with the establishment of a liquor accord – a written document that sets out specific aims, actions, objectives and strategies to address local alcohol-related problems. Each accord is approved by the VCGLR and Victoria Police. There are currently 60 approved accords.

First regional community stakeholder forum

 14 November 2019

(Quotes attributable to Catherine Myers, Chief Executive Officer, VCGLR)

The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) is hosting its first regional community stakeholder forum in Sale on Tuesday 19 November 2019.

Chief Executive Officer, Catherine Myers, said “The community stakeholder forums provide an opportunity for us to learn from local community organisations about gambling and liquor issues that are important to them and the local community, and allow us to showcase some of our key initiatives, resources and industry news”.

“This community stakeholder forum will bring together organisations including local council, community health and police to engage with our organisation and exchange knowledge and experiences, share insights and address local issues together,” said Catherine.

“The forum will focus on the work of the Sale team since its establishment in 2018 as well as recent organisational initiatives,” she said.

Sale was chosen for the forum as it is also the home of one of the VCGLR’s two regional hubs.

The VCGLR’s regional offices, in Sale and Ararat, were established in 2018 to allow the VCGLR to maximise coverage and oversight throughout the state. Funded in the 2017 Victorian State Budget, the hubs have also improved responsiveness to local community issues and harm related risks.

VCGLR Annual Report 2018-19 now available

17 October 2019

(Quotes attributable to Catherine Myers, Chief Executive Officer, VCGLR)

The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation’s (VCGLR) Annual Report 2018-19 was today tabled in State Parliament.

The Report highlights key outcomes and achievements of the VCGLR in the last financial year, including major investigations, enforcement outcomes and our performance against key priorities set out in our Corporate Plan 2017–20.

In 2018/19, the VCGLR completed three complex investigations into major gambling licensees: Tabcorp Wagering (Vic); Intralot Gaming Services; and Crown Melbourne Limited.

Each investigation identified significant improvement opportunities for licensees and resulted in disciplinary action.

The Report also includes an overview of the status of the VCGLR’s Crown China Investigation as at 30 June 2019, along with an addendum in relation to media reports published in July 2019 concerning the Melbourne casino licensee, Crown.

In response to the media reports and a subsequent announcement by the Minister for Consumer Affairs, Gaming and Liquor Regulation, the VCGLR committed to re-examine a range of issues that had been addressed as part of our most recent five yearly review of the casino operator and licence holder. The VCGLR has provided progress updates to the Minister on these matters. 

The outcomes and achievements contained in the Annual Report reflect the complexity of the work we do, the thoroughness in which we undertake our work, and our ongoing progress as a regulator. 

The Report demonstrates the action we take when liquor or gambling laws are breached, and where we deem licensee actions could increase the risks of alcohol and gambling related harm. 

Safe and responsible gambling and liquor environments are the focus of everything we do, and our Annual Report 2018-19 provides insights into the way we have embedded this in our work over the last year. 

To download a copy of the report, see: VCGLR Annual Report 2018-19

VCGLR closes karaoke bar for 24 hours

7 October 2019

(Quotes are attributable to a spokesperson for the VCGLR)

The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) has banned the sale of liquor for 24 hours at a Melbourne karaoke bar.

The VCGLR issued a written notice of suspension to the licensee of Bass Lounge in Little Bourke Street, Melbourne, after it recorded a fifth demerit point for non-compliance.

As a result, the venue was banned from selling liquor for a 24-hour period from 7.00am on Friday 4 October 2019.

A suspension of licence is triggered when a licensed venue reaches a threshold number of demerit points (5, 10, and 15 demerits).

The case of Bass Lounge is the first instance where a demerit points threshold has been reached by a licensee in Victoria. The demerit points system is designed to encourage compliance with liquor laws and foster a responsible liquor industry.

With over 11,750 liquor inspections undertaken so far this year, the VCGLR takes matters of noncompliance seriously and will take appropriate enforcement action in such cases. The VCGLR is committed to regulating Victoria’s gambling and liquor industries to ensure their integrity and to minimise harm so that Victorians and visitors can enjoy safe and responsible gambling and liquor environments.

Background information

Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998, liquor licensees incur demerit points relating to offences such as supplying liquor to an intoxicated person, permitting a drunk person on their premises, or supplying liquor to an underage person on a licensed premises.

Venues that do not comply with liquor laws can face a range of enforcement actions including prosecution, demerit points, infringement notices, warnings and disciplinary action.

Licensees who incur a demerit point are required to undertake additional training and education to ensure they are aware of their obligations and to reduce the likelihood of additional breaches.

For more information about the demerit point system, see: Demerit points system

Liquor licence renewal process moving to digital

30 September 2019

(Quotes attributable to Director Licensing, Alex Fitzpatrick)

The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) is making it quicker and easier for the 23,000 liquor licensees across the state to renew and manage their licence while saving a few trees along the way.

Each year the VCGLR post more than 45,000 letters to licensees with their renewal notice and annual liquor licences. Moving the renewal process online not only reduces paper and postage it also means licensees can avoid the wait of a mail out.

Licensees are currently posted a renewal notice in late November with payment due by 31 December. Moving the process online means licensees no longer need to wait a week or two to receive this. Once the renewal notice is ready it’s in their inbox instantly.

Licensees already signed up to the VCGLR’s Liquor Portal and have eLicence activated will receive their renewal notice via email from late November this year.

Once payment is made, licensees will automatically be emailed their liquor licence within five working days ready to print and display in their licensed venue.

Those who have not signed up to the Liquor Portal will need to do so by the end of October to receive these documents via email.

Licensees have been provided with resources and information to support their registration to the Liquor Portal. The Liquor Portal has other advantages for licensees including the ability to:

  • print a copy of your liquor licence at any time
  • download your renewal notice at any time
  • download your venue's red line plan
  • apply to add, replace or remove the Nominee associated with your liquor licence or permit
  • apply to add, replace or remove the Director(s)  associated with your liquor licence or permit
  • apply for a Restaurant and Cafe liquor licence
  • check the status of an application 

 

 

VCGLR supporting Geelong wine producers

23 September 2019

(Quotes attributable to Veronica Goluza, Manager Education, VCGLR)

The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) launched a new education campaign at Wine Geelong’s General Meeting last week.

The campaign, to be rolled out over the busy Victorian events season, is designed to help wine, beer, cider and spirit producers better understand their responsibilities and clarify the ins and outs of their liquor licences, including obligations for promotional events such as farmers’ markets and festivals.

Manager for Education, Veronica Goluza said “Collaborating with industry associations is really important and presenting at Wine Geelong was an opportunity to learn directly from licensees to inform our educational approach and develop targeted resources. This campaign will highlight how licensees can remain compliant and encourage them to adopt best practice”.

Wine Geelong is a non-profit industry association that was formed with the purpose of furthering and strengthening the development of viticulture, winemaking and tourism in Geelong and its sub-regions. Jo Wealands, Executive Officer and Event Manager for Wine Geelong said “It was great having the VCGLR present to our members about their liquor licences and off-site events”.

“It can sometimes be a daunting task fully understanding your obligations and everyone wants to know they are covered by the correct licence, whether it be for their cellar door, restaurant or participating in a wine festival,” Jo said. “It was really easy for our producers to ask questions, discuss concerns and understand their licensing obligations for the future”.

The VCGLR Education team will continue to visit as many venues as possible in both metro and regional areas for its Street Talk program to help licensees keep everyone safe from alcohol related harm.

The VCGLR is committed to ensuring Victorians and visitors enjoy safe and responsible gambling and liquor environements.

Spring Sports Blitz

23 September 2019

(Quotes attributable to Adam Ockwell, Director Compliance, VCGLR)

The VCGLR is targeting patron numbers, responsible service of alcohol and underage drinking and gambling as part of its Spring Sports Blitz.

Kicking off this week, the VCGLR Education Team will be taking to the streets around the MCG talking to venues about their licensing obligations and how to ensure the safety of venue staff and patrons over the busy Grand Final long weekend.

With the Public Holiday falling on a Friday, Thursday night often becomes a busy night for venues in the lead up to the Grand Final. The Education team’s ‘Street Talk’ this week will provide venues with information and advice on how to monitor patron numbers, ensure security staff are licensed, check for ID’s and tips to refuse service to intoxicated patrons. The team will also be handing out free venue signage that highlights their responsibilities when it comes to patron safety.

VCGLR inspectors will also be working over the weekend targeting venues hosting Grand Final events to monitor, and where necessary enforce, compliance with responsible service of alcohol and gambling and liquor licence obligations.

The AFL Grand Final is one of several major sporting events during Spring in Victoria. The VCGLR’s Spring Sports Blitz will ensure both venues and patrons understand the role they play to stay safe and enjoy responsible gambling and drinking.

The VCGLR is committed to ensuring Victorians and visitors enjoy safe and responsible gambling and liquor environments.

Media reports relating to AFL Sports Controlling Body

18 September 2019

(Quotes attributable to Catherine Myers, Chief Executive Officer, VCGLR)

The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) committed to review media reports regarding the AFL and the Melbourne Football Club after they were published by the Herald Sun in April this year.

The VCGLR found that the information and evidence published by the media formed part of its original investigation in 2012 which determined that the AFL had not breached its obligations as a Sports Controlling Body.

As no breaches of Victorian legislation were identified, the VCGLR will be taking no further action against the AFL in relation to this matter.

The AFL is the Sports Controlling Body for Australian Rules Football and as such, the VCGLR has oversight over the processes and systems put in place by the AFL to ensure the integrity of betting on sporting events under its control.

In accordance with the Gambling Regulation Act 2003 (the Act), the AFL as a Sports Controlling Body is required to notify the VCGLR in writing if it becomes aware of a breach or suspected breach of its policies, rules, codes of conduct or other mechanisms designed to ensure the integrity of the relevant sports betting event, as soon as practicable and in any event within 14 days of the breach or suspected breach.

Since the conclusion of the 2012 VCGLR investigation into the AFL in relation to the Melbourne Football Club tanking allegation, the AFL has updated its policies and procedures in line with recommendations made by the VCGLR to enhance its capacity to ensure the integrity of the AFL competition.

The obligations of a Sports Controlling Body and the role of the VCGLR in overseeing these are set out in the Act. The legislative framework emphasises the integrity of betting on sporting events. It requires Sports Controlling Bodies to have and maintain sports betting integrity processes and policies.

I am confident in the VCGLR’s capacity to discharge its regulatory responsibilities with all the expertise and professionalism required, including any ongoing and active investigation and oversight of AFL integrity matters.

The VCGLR is committed to ensuring the integrity of betting on sports events. In addition to the approval of Sports Controlling Bodies, the VCGLR undertakes its responsibilities as a regulator through mechanisms such as formal investigations, information gathered in the course of regular reviews and audits, complaints received and referrals to or from other agencies. Should IBAC undertake an investigation, the VCGLR would cooperate fully.

Match-fixing and related corrupt conduct is a criminal matter. Criminal matters are dealt with by Victoria Police.

Background information

The VCGLR regulates the integrity of sports betting through the approval of Sports Controlling Bodies (SCB) and sporting events. To be approved as an SCB, the VCGLR conducts a detailed examination of the application and considers the sporting bodies rules, policies and procedures particularly as they relate to the integrity of the competition and betting outcomes. The sporting body must have measures in place to maintain the integrity of approved betting events.

In accordance with section 4.5.32 of the Gambling Regulation Act 2003, a Sports Controlling Body is required to notify the VCGLR in writing if it becomes aware of a breach or suspected breach of its policies, rules, codes of conduct or other mechanisms designed to ensure the integrity of the relevant sports betting event, as soon as practicable and in any event within 14 days of the breach or suspected breach. It is also required to notify the VCGLR of any changes to integrity policies, rules or codes of conduct.

A Sports Controlling Body must also notify the VCGLR in writing of the action taken to investigate any breach or suspected breach and the result of any such investigation on its completion. Ongoing monitoring of Sports Controlling Bodies includes a periodic review and a reporting scheme which requires Sports Controlling Bodies to report breaches of integrity processes.

Match-fixing is illegal and a criminal matter. Criminal matters are a matter for Victoria Police.

Prosecution of unlicensed venue in Melbourne's eastern suburbs

16 September 2019

(Quotes attributable to Adam Ockwell, Director Compliance)

The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) has successfully prosecuted a Croydon cocktail bar for selling liquor without a liquor licence.

Thanks to a tip off from the community via its online complaints process, VCGLR inspectors observed the unlawful sale of liquor shortly after receiving the complaint and immediately took action.

VCGLR inspectors attended the venue, Envy Cocktail Lounge, in mid-2018 to discover that the company and its director did not hold a liquor licence. Following the inspection, evidence gathered by the VCGLR indicated that the premises had been operating unlicensed for a period of time.

Once discovered, the VCGLR issued charges against the company (Envy Cocktails Pty Ltd) relating to the unlicensed selling of liquor (contrary to section 107 (1) of the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 (LCR Act)) and also charged the Director of the company personally of the same offence.

A hearing of the matter by the Ringwood Magistrates’ Court resulted in Envy Cocktails Pty Ltd being convicted of both the unlicensed sale and offer of liquor and ordered it to pay a fine of $2,500.00, the VCGLR’s costs of $100.00 and statutory costs of $127.40. The Magistrate also ordered that the director of Envy Cocktails Pty Ltd be convicted of the offence of unlicensed selling of liquor and ordered he pay a fine of $3,500.00, the VCGLR’s costs of $100.00 and statutory costs of $84.40.

The total ordered penalties are one of the highest imposed by the Magistrates’ Court for an offence under the LCR Act and demonstrates the important need for businesses selling liquor to ensure they hold a valid liquor licence.

With over 11,750 liquor inspections undertaken in 2018-19, the VCGLR takes matters of noncompliance seriously and will take appropriate enforcement action in such cases. The VCGLR is committed to regulating Victoria’s gambling and liquor industries to ensure their integrity and to minimise harm so that Victorians and visitors can enjoy safe and responsible gambling and liquor environments.

Background information

The Liquor Control Reform Act 1998 (LCR Act) regulates the supply and consumption of liquor in Victoria. Businesses are not only required to hold the appropriate licence relevant to the type of business but also ensure that the licence is held by them and transferred to them.

In the case of Envy Cocktail Lounge, a restaurant and cafe licence was in force at the premises, but was held by Newmarket Café Pty Ltd - a deregistered company. While Envy Cocktails had the right to occupy the premises under a formal lease agreement, neither the company, nor its Director, held a liquor licence at the time.

The VCGLR regulates businesses focusing on the people, premises, products and promotions involved in supplying gambling and liquor. Anyone wishing to make a complaint alleging a breach of one of the Acts we administer (including the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998, Gambling Regulation Act 2003 and the Casino Control Act 1991) can do so via our website and each complaint will be assessed. To lodge a complaint or for more information about complaints and our complaint process, see: Complaints

VCGLR update on the re-examination of issues relating to Crown

26 August 2019

(Quotes attributable to Catherine Myers, Chief Executive Officer, VCGLR)

The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation has provided an update to the Minister for Consumer Affairs, Gaming and Liquor on the re-examination of issues relating to Crown Melbourne Limited that were recently reported by the media. The issues are complex and therefore further time is required to conduct a thorough review. Two recommendations from the Sixth Casino Review that are being considered as part of the reexamination, address matters relating to money laundering and integrity (recommendations 17 and 19 respectively). Both were due for completion by 1 July 2019, and Crown made submissions by the due date in relation to each. These are currently being considered by the Commission. The VCGLR will continue to provide updates to the Minister on these issues and if there is any further action that needs to be taken as a result of the re-examination, the VCGLR will act.

VCGLR probity investigation into Melco purchase of Crown

9 August 2019

(Quotes attributable to Catherine Myers, CEO, VCGLR)

The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) was notified earlier this year that Consolidated Press Holdings Pty Limited has entered into a share sale agreement to sell down part of its shareholding (19.99 per cent) in Crown Resorts Limited to Melco Resorts and Entertainment Limited (Melco).

The VCGLR will shortly commence its detailed probity assessment and investigation of the suitability of Melco and its associates to become associates of the Victorian casino operator under Victorian legislation.

Under the (Victorian) Casino Control Act 1991 (the Act), the Commission must be satisfied that the casino operator and its associates are suitable to conduct a casino business. In circumstances where a person is becoming an associate of the casino operator, the Commission must inquire into the change to determine whether it is satisfied that the person is a suitable person to be associated with the management of the casino (in this case, Melco Resorts and Entertainment Ltd and its associates) are persons of good repute, having regard to character, honesty and integrity and other matters. If it is not so satisfied, the Commission must take such actions as it considers appropriate.

There is no time limit set out in the Act for the Commission to undertake its inquiries.

In addition to its own probity investigation, the VCGLR will work closely with its counterparts in NSW and WA in relation to the purchase and suitability of Melco, and will assist where necessary, the NSW Independent Liquor and Gaming Authority as it conducts its own inquiry under the powers set out by NSW legislation.

The legislative requirements that govern gaming licensees, including casino operators, are independent between state government jurisdictions and as such may differ. The VCGLR’s powers are set under the following Victorian legislations:

  • • Gambling Regulation Act 2003 • Casino Control Act 1991
  • • Casino (Management Agreement) Act 1993 • Gambling Regulation (Pre-commitment and Loyalty Scheme) Regulations 2014
  • • Gambling Regulations 2015
  • • Gambling Regulation (Premium Customer) Regulations 2011
  • • Casino Control (Fees) Regulations 2015

Additional information

If the VCGLR is not satisfied about the suitability of Melco and its associates, the VCCGLR will take such actions as it considers appropriate. Please see section 28 of the Act.

Re-examination of issues relating to Crown

2 August 2019

(Quotes attributable to Catherine Myers, Chief Executive Officer, VCGLR)

Following the announcement by the Minister for Consumer Affairs, Gaming and Liquor Regulation (the Minister), the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) has committed to re-examining the issues relating to Crown Melbourne Limited (Crown) that have been reported in the media recently.

Many of the issues reported were carefully examined by the VCGLR as part of its detailed investigation into the suitability of Crown as the casino licence holder in the Sixth Review of the Casino Operator and Licence (the Review) which was finalised in 2018. If there is any further action that needs to be taken as a result of the re-examination, the VCGLR will act.

Crown is regulated by a wide range of state and federal government regulators and law enforcement agencies. The VCGLR’s main regulatory functions are the regulation of gaming and liquor. A variety of other agencies regulate other areas of Crown’s operations.

As part of the Review, the VCGLR engaged with other enforcement agencies and regulators on relevant issues such as money laundering and junket operators. The VCGLR has ongoing relationships with various agencies and regulators and will engage with those agencies about matters that relate to their jurisdiction to see if there is any new data or evidence that is relevant to Crown’s obligations under Victorian gambling legislation.

The VCGLR has a dedicated casino team that operates at the casino 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. In addition to this team, the VCGLR have dedicated auditors and investigators that conduct regular audits of casino operations related to high risk activities, including ensuring that Crown conducts ongoing probity checks and assessments regarding junket operators. If any matters come to our attention that fall outside the VCGLR’s regulatory remit, they are referred to the relevant agency.

Under the Casino Control Act 1991 the casino operator is required to ensure that an approved system of internal controls is implemented. The VCGLR monitors the casino operator’s implementation of these systems and controls through an active audit program. The VCGLR takes seriously any failure by the casino operator to implement these controls – and has taken disciplinary action and issued fines in this area.

The Minister also requested a review of the regulatory oversight of junket operators in Victoria. The VCGLR will assist the Department of Justice and Community Safety to review the regulatory arrangements in this area.

VCGLR and Crown Melbourne

1 August 2019

(Quotes attributable to Catherine Myers, Chief Executive Officer, VCGLR)

The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) is committed to ensuring that Victorians and visitors enjoy safe and responsible gambling and liquor environments We understand that allegations have been referred to Commonwealth agencies for investigation and the VCGLR will provide any assistance it can and cooperate fully with any investigation they may undertake. Allegations that fall within the remit of the Commission will be examined by the VCGLR. The Sixth Review of the Casino Operator and Licence thoroughly examined the operations of the Melbourne Casino in relation to the matters set out in the Casino Control Act 1991. The Commission continues to undertake a thorough and rigorous assessment of the submissions made by Crown in respect to the recommendations and the outcomes will be reported back to Government. 

Media reports of Melbourne Casino junket operators

29 July 2019

The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) is responsible for regulation of the Victorian Casino operator, Crown Melbourne Limited (Crown), which includes Crown’s operation of junket and premium player programs. The VCGLR approves systems of internal controls and administrative and accounting procedures for the casino and ensures Crown complies with these internal controls and procedures through its regular monitoring and compliance activities at the casino.

The VCGLR conducts a wide range of regulatory activities as part of its ongoing regulation and monitoring of the casino operator. It can take a range of enforcement actions at any time if it considers it appropriate to do so.

The VCGLR has taken regulatory action against Crown with respect to junkets on a number of occasions. Details of any disciplinary action taken by the Commission, including against Crown, are published in VCGLR Annual Reports as well as on the VCGLR website, see: Enforcement actions

There is more information regarding specific regulatory action in the VCGLR’s Sixth Review of the Casino Operator and Licence (30 June 2018) available on the VCGLR website, see: Sixth Casino Review

The VCGLR’s Sixth Casino Review also identified areas for improvement for the casino operator which are addressed through a number of recommendations. The VCGLR continues to monitor and review the outcomes of these recommendations as part of its regular monitoring and compliance activities.

Crown is regulated by a wide range of state and federal government regulators and law enforcement agencies. The VCGLR’s main regulatory functions are the regulation of gaming and alcohol, while other bodies regulate many other areas of the casino’s operations. For example, Crown is subject to some particular regulatory obligations, including obligations to report particular types of transactions to AUSTRAC, the Federal Government body that administers the Anti-Money Laundering and Counter Terrorism Financing Act 2006.

As one of a number of regulators, the VCGLR works proactively with relevant regulators and law enforcement agencies including Victoria Police and AUSTRAC. Any matters that fall outside the VCGLR’s remit are referred to the relevant agency.

Through the VCGLR complaints process, we investigate alleged breaches under a number of Acts, including the Casino Control Act 1991. The VCGLR strongly encourages anyone with information related to alleged breaches by the casino operator, to submit this information via this process available on our website, see: Complaints

The VCGLR is continuing to consider the well-publicised events regarding Crown’s international commission-based business and its international sales team in China. 

Consolidated Press Holdings Pty Ltd sale of Crown Resorts shares to Melco

31 May 2019

 The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) has been notified that Consolidated Press Holdings Pty Limited has entered into a share sale agreement to sell down part of its shareholding (19.99 per cent) in Crown Resorts Limited to Melco Resorts and Entertainment Limited (Melco). The new associated entity (Melco) and any associated individuals will need to be approved by the VCGLR pursuant to the Casino Control Act 1991.

Regulator bans plastic picks at Melbourne Casino

 7 March 2019

The Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation (VCGLR) is the independent statutory authority that regulates Victoria’s gambling and liquor industries.

The VCGLR’s vision is that Victorians and visitors enjoy safe and responsible gambling and liquor environments. The VCGLR will take appropriate action to prevent and minimise the risk of harm in these industries in accordance with its published regulatory approach.

In 2018, the VCGLR received a complaint in relation to the supply and use of plastic button picks at the Melbourne casino. Button picks are devices which allowed patrons to play continuously on some electronic gaming machines without needing to re-press a button for a new spin.

The VCGLR investigated this complaint. The Melbourne casino operator, Crown Melbourne Ltd (Crown), cooperated with the VCGLR’s investigation and advised that it had ceased supplying button picks prior to the commencement of the investigation.

Following the investigation, the VCGLR has determined that the distribution and use of button picks may increase the risk of gambling related harm and, as such, should not be permitted. Accordingly, the VCGLR has today issued a direction to Crown under the Casino Control Act 1991 to prohibit the supply and prevent the use of button picks at the Melbourne casino.

The VCGLR will monitor this issue. Crown is required to report to the VCGLR concerning the actions it has taken to implement the direction. 

 

Subscribe to media releases

To receive email alerts when we publish new media releases, subscribe here. If already subscribed, and you would like to update your preferences click here

Page last modified 
19 November 2019